Stonewall Buoy Report….

August 8th & 9th, 2009

The Stonewall Banks Buoy Report called for a 2.6′ swell with a 0.7′ wind wave….

Saturday The mornings buoy weather report was the best we had heard all season, so our anticipation for the day was at a fever pitch!  Our fishermen for the day showed up on the dock, and we quickly went through the safety orientation so we could get out on the water early.  After getting everything in order, we motored through the harbor entrance into a dark ocean and worked our way out past the buoy line, going slowly until it was light enough to see the many crab trap marker floats that populate the area.  When it was light enough to see, we plotted a course to a heading of about 270 degrees and put the throttles down, to rapidly work our way out to the Tuna grounds.

The water temperature looked very good, way before the color did, so we ended up going out about 40 miles before finding good water color and our first Tuna.  The action was very spotty, with only a single fish here and there, but the fish were all very large with most or all of them in the 30 lb range.  For the first time this season, we started to see fish boiling, porpoising and jumping on the surface, so we broke out the jig rods and started throwing to them.  “FISH ON!”  Catching a big tuna on a jig rod, is an experience like no other.  They put up a remarkable battle, and because we have the boat shut completely down and everything is quiet, this is a very unique and special type of ocean fishing.  This method also requires us to hunt for, spot, and stalk the Tuna.

What a great time we had.  Before we knew it, it was time to head back to port, stopping once to cast and hook another couple of jumpers.  Our thanks for a great day to Rick, Jack, Randy and Tim who went home with coolers full of yummy Tuna fillets.  You guys, as always, are a great bunch to spend the day with.  Thank you!

SundayWow, what a difference a day makes!  The ocean could not have been any more different than it was on Saturday!  We had a pretty good idea of what to expect, as the boats which had left port before us, were calling back on the radio’s saying what a big surprise the ocean conditions were.

We had it in our mind to fish Halibut and Salmon, so we headed out to the Halibut grounds in a bumpy sea.  Listening to the radio’s we heard a few boats headed out to fish for Tuna, call and say they had decided to turn around because of the poor conditions.  After 17 miles of fairly slow going, we found ourselves at the halibut area called the “Rock Pile” to join probably another 30 boats to try our hand for a tasty flat fish.  We ended up catching and returning a small Halibut and several Ling Cod, before heading in to try for some Coho Salmon.

Listening to the radio’s on the ride in, it sounded like the catching was pretty slow everywhere so we just put our gear in the water and hoped for the best.  Nothing much was happening outside Newport where we first stopped, so we picked up and moved north to try an area outside Depoe Bay to find some Salmon.  Jared assisted with trolling captain duties, helped pilot the boat North, and tuned out to be the hot Salmon catcher of the group!  Wow, what a kid!

After trolling around patiently and having a couple spurts of furious action, we headed back to port with some nice shiny Salmon in the box.  Brandy, Pat, Jim and Jared sure developed a technique for getting those Salmon in the boat quickly!  After getting back to the docks, we filleted and vacuum packed the days catch, and saw everyone off to home, tired and happy.  Thanks guy’s for the great time we had with you.  Let’s do it again!


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Jack

Randy

Randy

Rick

Rick

Tim

Tim

Charlie

Charlie

Tim, Rick, Dave, Randy & Jack

Tim, Rick, Dave, Randy & Jack

Netting Rick's Jig Caught Tuna!

Netting Rick's Jig Caught Tuna. Just Look at this Ocean!

Jared

Jared

Jim

Jim

Brandy

Brandy

Pat

Pat

Jared & Jim

Jared & Jim

New Captain??

New Captain??

Plotting a Course....

Plotting a Course....

Weather Buoy

Weather Buoy Off Newport Oregon